Transformative Innovation in Health and Social Care

Professors Thilo Kroll and Huw Davies, Co-Directors of SDHI along with colleagues

Dr Margaret Hannah, Director of Public Health, NHS Fife
Professor Vikki Entwistle, Health Services Research Unit, University of Aberdeen
Professor Brendan McCormack, School of Nursing, Queen Margaret University
Professor Belinda Dewar, University of the West of Scotland
Graham Leicester, Director, International Futures Forum
Nicola Gray, Programme Manager, Scottish Improvement Science Collaborating Centre

have been awarded funding from the Scottish Universities Insight Institute (SUII) for a project entitled Understanding, forming and fostering a culture of transformative innovation in health and social care

This proposal focuses on the kinds of transformative innovation that are needed within services and communities to address pressing concerns about the appropriateness and sustainability of health and social care provision across whole populations. It brings together leading Scottish and international thinkers and practitioners from three key areas of research and practice development, and provides a structured but flexible programme within which they can generate synergistic insights into the conditions that can enable the kinds of cultures of transformative innovation that could foster the provision of health and social support consistent with the best aspirations of humanity.

The three areas of practice and development that underpin the programme are: (1) Fifth wave thinking (ideas oriented to deal with the contemporary challenges of public health for which previous major developments in public health are proving insufficient); (2) Person-centred care (a cluster of ideas about both what is humane and morally appropriate in health and social care provision and how people can contribute to their own health and wellbeing); and (3) Transformation (studies of transformative rather than less radical or far-reaching forms of innovation).

Building out from existing collaborations within the three areas, programme partners and participants have been drawn from universities and from state and third sector policy leaders and health and social care providers. Supported by a strong commitment particularly from the International Futures Forum, a series of webinars and workshops will enable a sharing of current understandings and perspectives and facilitate fresh, multidisciplinary and cross-sectoral conversations oriented both to understand and promote positive transformation both during and beyond the span of the programme.

The objectives of the proposed work are:

  1. Create the space for creative and productive cross-boundary and inter-disciplinary ‘facilitated dialogue’ to scope out the relevant bodies of work and strands of thinking that can underpin transformative innovation in health and social care and public health;
  2. Build a cumulative vision of the relevant organisational and system features of transformation-enabled public services around population health and care;
  3. Map a series of actions for key influencers within the system that may help to bring about the conditions for transformation capacities and capabilities;
  4. Define the means by which we can develop an assessment of the progress towards building such transformative capacities and capabilities;
  5. Create an action-focused research agenda to provide a better evidence base for the underpinnings of transformation through innovation in health and social care and public health.
  6. Prompt the emergence of new collaborations that can take forward investigations and actions in support of both research and transformative change.

Humanising Healthcare – Hope for a System under Strain

Group reflects on Humanising Healthcare

SDHI in collaboration with NHS Fife, the Scottish Improvement Science Collaborating Centre (SISCC) and the International Futures Forum (IFF) hosted an interprofessional and interdisciplinary seminar and workshop with 20 participants to envision the future  of  a  healthcare system currently under strain. Dr Margaret Hannah, Consultant and Deputy Director of Public Health in the NHS Fife and author of ‘Humanising Healthcare: Patterns of Hope for a System under Strain’ and Graham Leicester, Director of the International Futures Forum (IFF) facilitated the afternoon with SDHI Co-Director Thilo Kroll.

Healthcare systems are under ever increasing performance pressures and exposed to massive rises in expenditures. At the same time criticism of the way we deliver health care grows highlighting the lack of compassion and a detachment of people’s life priorities and choices. Inequalities in health care access, treatment use and outcomes are not being tackled adequately. The research that supposedly generates the evidence base for effective therapies and interventions is selective, exclusionary, de-contextualised and for many long-term conditions flawed. Faced with a growing number of people who manage not one but multiple long-term conditions outside institutions in diverse community settings health care systems lack co-ordinated, integrated quality practice models that are centred around people’s lives and not primary their health conditions.

So, what are the alternatives to the status quo? What can we learn from the past? Perhaps, very timely 2015 saw a re-publication of the book ‘A Fortunate Man: The Story of a Country Doctor’ by John Berger and Jean Mohr. The book had originally been written in 1967 and was based on the sensitive portrait of John Sassall, a GP in the Forest of Dean. It illustrates his relationships with the diverse residents of this rural community and his approach to understanding the delivery of health care in the context of the social and environmental fabric of rural living. A quote from the book illustrates this very well

“Landscapes can be deceptive. Sometimes a landscape seems to be less a setting for the life of its inhabitants than a curtain behind which their struggles, achievements and accidents take place. For those who, with the inhabitants, are behind the curtain, landmarks are no longer only geographic but also biographical and personal.” (pp 18-21)

Margaret Hannah describes in her book the way our current healthcare arrangements are costly, guideline driven and dis-ease and disorder focused. Hope lies in adopting a salutogenic, asset-based approach that works with (not for) individuals and communities as co-creators of health. The workshop identified opportunities for transformational change in the way we deliver healthcare through  co-creation approaches and participatory action research. It also requires the collaboration with non-traditional partners in health, i.e. community organisations, local authorities.

We  are  currently working on a briefing paper based on the  workshop, which we will make available for reflection and discussion shortly.

Graham Leicester capturing ideas from the discussion

 

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Save the Date: Humanising Healthcare Seminar – 25 March 2015

SDHI is pleased to announce a seminar to discuss themes in a recently published book called Humanising Healthcare: Patterns of Hope for a System under Strain by Dr Margaret Hannah, Deputy Director of Public Health, NHS Fife. This FREE seminar will take place on Wednesday 25th March 2015 from 1.30pm in 1LG03, Dalhousie Building, University of Dundee.  For further information please see event flyer.

To register your attendance please book online here