Symposium – Challenging interventions with an obese society

ISBNPA St Andrews Brochure_Page_1This satellite meeting, on Monday 8th June 2015 at the University of St Andrews offers a range of interactive sessions, work-share structured discussions and a designer led approach to creative opportunities for increasing awareness and action around physical activity and diet for weight management. Presentations include recent work on new visual tools for assessing unhealthy body weight in children, effective communications and brief interventions.

Those with an interest in optimising communications about obesity research (involving diet and physical activity) are welcome to the meeting for an interactive day with time for sharing experiences, reflections and ideas.

There will be the opportunity for a walk and talk poster presentation session, with a prize for the most innovative presentation.

For more details see http://isbnpasat2015.org/ or contact (jc100 @st-andrews.ac.uk) or (a.s.anderson @dundee.ac.uk)

HSRN Symposium 1-2 July 2015 in Nottingham

Involved in Health Services Research? The Health Services Research Network (HSRN) is hosting their annual HSRN Symposium, 1-2 July 2015 in Nottingham. This provides the ideal opportunity for you to hear and discuss cutting edge health services research.  Come and listen, have your say, make your opinion count and network with the some of the leading health services researchers in the UK and internationally. Find out more here.

HSRN represents and connects everyone interested in health service innovation, evidence and improvement. It is the collective voice for health services research in policy and practice. It brings together those who produce and use evidence to improve services. You can find out more about HSRN here.

Vacancy: Director of the Alliance for Self Care Research

The Alliance for Self Care Research (ASCR) currently has a vacancy for a Director.  This post is open to any member of staff from the Universities of Dundee, St Andrews, Stirling or Aberdeen who have an interest in Self Care Research.  For further information please see Job spec.

“Managing doctors, doctors managing: Troubled relations at the heart of the NHS” A blog post by Huw Davies

Huw Davies, Co-Director of SDHI of Professor of Health Care Policy and Management at the University of St Andrews. is engaged in Nuffield Trust funded work on NHS management and culture on the back of the Francis inquiry and report into the failures of care at Mid Staffordshire NHS Trust. Read about Huw’s insights and views in a recent blog post on the Nuffield Trust website.

Humanising Healthcare – Hope for a System under Strain

Group reflects on Humanising Healthcare

SDHI in collaboration with NHS Fife, the Scottish Improvement Science Collaborating Centre (SISCC) and the International Futures Forum (IFF) hosted an interprofessional and interdisciplinary seminar and workshop with 20 participants to envision the future  of  a  healthcare system currently under strain. Dr Margaret Hannah, Consultant and Deputy Director of Public Health in the NHS Fife and author of ‘Humanising Healthcare: Patterns of Hope for a System under Strain’ and Graham Leicester, Director of the International Futures Forum (IFF) facilitated the afternoon with SDHI Co-Director Thilo Kroll.

Healthcare systems are under ever increasing performance pressures and exposed to massive rises in expenditures. At the same time criticism of the way we deliver health care grows highlighting the lack of compassion and a detachment of people’s life priorities and choices. Inequalities in health care access, treatment use and outcomes are not being tackled adequately. The research that supposedly generates the evidence base for effective therapies and interventions is selective, exclusionary, de-contextualised and for many long-term conditions flawed. Faced with a growing number of people who manage not one but multiple long-term conditions outside institutions in diverse community settings health care systems lack co-ordinated, integrated quality practice models that are centred around people’s lives and not primary their health conditions.

So, what are the alternatives to the status quo? What can we learn from the past? Perhaps, very timely 2015 saw a re-publication of the book ‘A Fortunate Man: The Story of a Country Doctor’ by John Berger and Jean Mohr. The book had originally been written in 1967 and was based on the sensitive portrait of John Sassall, a GP in the Forest of Dean. It illustrates his relationships with the diverse residents of this rural community and his approach to understanding the delivery of health care in the context of the social and environmental fabric of rural living. A quote from the book illustrates this very well

“Landscapes can be deceptive. Sometimes a landscape seems to be less a setting for the life of its inhabitants than a curtain behind which their struggles, achievements and accidents take place. For those who, with the inhabitants, are behind the curtain, landmarks are no longer only geographic but also biographical and personal.” (pp 18-21)

Margaret Hannah describes in her book the way our current healthcare arrangements are costly, guideline driven and dis-ease and disorder focused. Hope lies in adopting a salutogenic, asset-based approach that works with (not for) individuals and communities as co-creators of health. The workshop identified opportunities for transformational change in the way we deliver healthcare through  co-creation approaches and participatory action research. It also requires the collaboration with non-traditional partners in health, i.e. community organisations, local authorities.

We  are  currently working on a briefing paper based on the  workshop, which we will make available for reflection and discussion shortly.

Graham Leicester capturing ideas from the discussion

 

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Scottish Graduate School of Social Sciences Summer School 2015 Online Booking System Now Open

The programme for the Scottish Graduate School of Social Sciences Summer School 2015 has been finalised with a lot of interesting and relevant sessions.

The Summer School runs between Monday 8th and Friday 12th June, in Edinburgh. This year, we have opted to have all courses in the same week: a selection of sessions on research and transferable skills, and software training, for students from across the social sciences (irrespective of funding source!!!).

The online booking system is now open and students, irrespective of geographic location or PhD funding, are welcome to book. By popular demand we will have daily rates rather than weekly, and the cost is just £20 per day.

In addition, there are lunchtime events on internships and international students, plus an opportunity to meet leading early career academics. In the evenings there will be a drinks reception, a pub quiz, a film screening and an outdoor social event.

Please tell your students and your colleagues about Summer School 2015, and look at the SGSSS website for more details about the sessions. There will also be a poster available shortly – please get in touch if you’d like a copy to display!

http://www.socsciscotland.ac.uk/events/summer_school

If you have any questions, please get in touch with the SGSSS Events team by email: events@socsciscotland.ac.uk.